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On World Contraception Day, it might seem surprising that we still need to raise awareness about contraceptive care in Europe. But our work with some of Europe's most vulnerable communities brings home how much contraceptive care still changes and saves lives.
The recent protests following the death of George Floyd due to police violence demonstrate once again how structurally embedded social inequality is within our societies. COVID-19 has exacerbated these inequalities.
No matter where we live, what we look like, or what income we might have, this pandemic affects us all. IPPF members around Europe and Central Asia, as throughout the world, continue to do their best to ensure that all people can lead safe and dignified reproductive lives even in confinement.
Women in Georgia face many challenges in accessing sexual and reproductive health care. For starters, many live in rural communities where job opportunities are limited and poverty is high.
Georgia, a low-middle income country located at the crossroads between western Asia and eastern Europe, has come a long way since gaining independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.
Tamar (not her real name) was 30 and a mother of two children when she found out she was facing an unintended pregnancy.
The many barriers that women in Georgia face in accessing safe care mean many are forced into trying to induce abortion themselves. These attempts are often unsuccessful and can be extremely harmful.
In Georgia, it is legal for doctors to deny women abortion care based on their personal beliefs. This remains the case in remote regions where there is only one clinic.
Abortion is not covered by the national health care system, not even for socially vulnerable people.
Dina was just 15 years old when she married her husband, and 16 years old when she had her first child.