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MEPs play a huge role in securing reproductive freedom and gender equality in the EU and abroad. Following the election of a new European Parliament, IPPF EN will continue working closely with them to ensure that these issues remain high on the EU’s agenda.
Her story is similar to many women across Georgia whose life choices are limited because they have been denied a full education, and who get married young and are then expected to raise a family.
The North Macedonian Parliament adopted a law on March 14, 2019, that makes dignified, women-focused abortion care a reality. The new law puts women’s needs at the heart of the system, dismantling many of the obstacles that until now undermined their reproductive autonomy and made it difficult to access basic health care.
Georgia, a low-middle income country located at the crossroads between western Asia and eastern Europe, has come a long way since gaining independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.
Tamar (not her real name) was 30 and a mother of two children when she found out she was facing an unintended pregnancy.
The many barriers that women in Georgia face in accessing safe care mean many are forced into trying to induce abortion themselves. These attempts are often unsuccessful and can be extremely harmful.
In Georgia, it is legal for doctors to deny women abortion care based on their personal beliefs. This remains the case in remote regions where there is only one clinic.
Abortion is not covered by the national health care system, not even for socially vulnerable people.
Women in Georgia face many challenges in accessing sexual and reproductive health care. For starters, many live in rural communities where job opportunities are limited and poverty is high.
Dina was just 15 years old when she married her husband, and 16 years old when she had her first child.