Spanish abortion reform: Parliament rejects amendments to government bill

12th June 2015
On 11 June, the Spanish parliament rejected amendments submitted by several parties to an abortion bill proposed by the conservative government that aims to create a legal requirement for 16 and 17 years old girls who want an abortion to have parental consent.

On 11 June, the Spanish parliament rejected amendments submitted by several parties to an abortion bill proposed by the conservative government that aims to create a legal requirement for 16 and 17 years old girls who want an abortion to have parental consent.

Medical societies, NGOs – particularly those working on women’s rights - and international agencies have warned that if adopted, this law will threaten the health of the most vulnerable young women, who may face clandestine and unsafe abortions. Most girls of 16 and 17 inform their parents about their decision to have an abortion, and the current legislation states that this information to parents is not required if it could put the girl at risk. This applies, for example, in situations of domestic violence or insurmountable conflict. If the proposed bill is approved, it is this group of vulnerable young girls that could be left unprotected.

As for next steps, the bill could be approved by September, even though several parliamentary groups have asked the government not to go ahead with it before the general election scheduled for November on the grounds that the proposal does not reflect public opinion.

Thanks to FPFE, IPPF's Spanish Member Association, for this update.